Tuesday, August 29, 2006

How to Prepare for a Conference as a Host

How to Prepare for a Conference as a Host

It’s no secret that the Christian Conference is increasingly becoming the popular setting in which to educate believers about matters of ministry.
Seminary may not be cost effective for lay leaders and aspiring evangelists and/or those individuals looking to live out God’s purpose for their lives.
Conference planners say there are some basic things to consider in the planning process.
You can begin the process in your planning by Zeroing In On Your Vision, said Dr. Stacia Pierce co-pastor of Lansing,Mich.-based Life Changers.
"When planning a special event, have a target or purpose in mind for the event. Identify the audience you want to reach and the tone of your conference," she said. "Establish clear goals for your conference to help keep you and your team focused.
1. Create an Atmosphere: "The conference theme, d├ęcor, music and guest service all create an atmosphere that will either enhance or diminish the experience of your conference attendees.
2. Count up the Cost: "Determine the budget, advertising, personnel, training needed to make your event a success."
3. Seek Sponsorship: Conference and event planner Robin Ware of the Atlanta-based The Ware Agency said don’t be reluctant to ask for help.
"Commercial vendors and sponsors are approachable and supportive of religious (faith-based) events/conferences because they understand that church people are viable consumers," Ware said.
5. Location: "If you aren’t using your own church, begin to narrow down host cities. This is where it is wise to employ a Conference Planner. They will be able to give you wise counsel and guidance," she said.
Research: "Find out what other conferences and events are being hosted during your desired dates. Make sure you aren’t competing with any other major events in your city, in your church and within the gospel community."


6. Guest speakers and artists: "Obtain their Riders and Hospitality Forms. Riders are provided by artists and Hospitality Forms by preachers and workshop presenters. These will state their honorariums and travel requirements. Preachers and Speakers don’t typically quote prices but they have an amount they normally are paid and will communicate it to you verbally through their offices if its not located on the Hospitality Form," said Ware and to be sure to purchase event insurance."

Also see: www.thewareagency.com and www.ministrymarketingsolutions.com

Thursday, August 03, 2006

ChristianBookPublicity

ChristianBookPublicity

PROPAGATING PROSPERITY
In the church is the buzzword, "prosperity." We hear about it, we talk about it and we name and claim it. It is all a faith walk - mirrored by our talk.
Yet, in the industry of ministry, those who are in business providing goods and services to those in the church community - there is a gap. A big gap.
It seems that only those in ministry are allowed to prosper and those that they do business with are asked to "sow."
From personal experience, I have seen ministers, preachers and Christian business people, continue to ask for reduced prices and services for FREE. They have said in so many words that if you provide "favor" to me then God would bless my business.
As a Christian in business and wanting to be a blessing, time and time again we have given way a lot. We have sowed a lot. We have changed rules to fit client situations. We have done this for years…and now I ask, "isn't it time for favor to come to us?" The favor is when we quote a fair price and the bill is paid - on time.
I know that the Word of God says, "give unto your servants that which is just and equal, knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven. (Colossians 4:1)." In other words, don't take advantage of those who are doing work for you - just because you're in "full time ministry." Truthfully, we're all in full-time ministry. And money is needed to run every ministry.
Is today's Christian becoming so carnal that all they care about is material gain - at the expense of someone else? If a person works hard, provides good service, is genuinely concerned about your mission/vision and welfare, shouldn't you reward them handsomely? Even worldly businesses do that.
Why is it that ministries seem to think it is OK to pay "secular" business - helping them achieve wealth - but when it comes to paying those who are dedicated to servicing ministry, there is a mindset that says, "pay less" or "pay later."
If we truly want to propagate prosperity among God's people - we must learn the Golden Rule. Bottom line: Treat (pay) others the way you want to treated (paid). We would see prosperity multiplied through out the Kingdom when this mentality becomes a revelation.

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